SALE: 3 Pack Hand Sanitizer $2.99 --- 50 Pack Face Masks for $11.10. CLICK HERE!

Foods That Have Magnesium

Foods that Have Magnesium

Magnesium deficiency remains a concern and many people sought to get enough magnesium in their diet. The average American diet doesn’t contain enough foods that have magnesium. In fact, it contains barely over 50% of the US recommended daily allowance (RDA) of magnesium.[1] Adult men should consume at least 400 mg/day of magnesium and women should consume at least 310 mg/day. These numbers increase to 420 mg/day and 320 mg/day after age 30, respectively. The Linus Pauling Institute recommends taking a daily magnesium supplement to ensure an intake of at least 100 mg of magnesium/day.

The Problem with Obtaining Magnesium Rich Food

Obtaining magnesium through diet is difficult today for three reasons:

  1. Reduced magnesium due to processing
    1. Processing foods removes magnesium. For example, oils that are refined loses their natural magnesium content. Refined grains have only 3-10% of their natural magnesium left. Refined sugar loses all of its magnesium. [2]
  2. Reduced levels due to modern industrial agriculture
    1. Experts link vitamin and mineral depletion in the soil to use of pesticides and fertilizers. For example, Swiss researchers of Institute of Plant Sciences of Zurich found that organic farming more than doubled the Vitamin B12 content of spinach and tripled B12 levels in barley.[3] In addition modern nitrogen based fertilizers make plants grow faster bulk with carbohydrates and water, sacrificing nutritional quality. [4]
  3. Poor diets full of processed and refined foods

What Happens When I Don’t Get Enough Magnesium?

Studies have shown correlations between low magnesium levels with high blood pressure, heart disease, migraine headaches, & osteoporosis. People who are magnesium deficient will experience loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, & weakness.[5]

Why Does My Body Need Magnesium Rich Food?

The body uses a molecule called ATP as an energy source. ATP functions properly when it is accompanied by magnesium, which helps to ATP stabilization until it is used. Since ATP is important for genetic information, magnesium also plays a crucial role in growth and development. In addition, magnesium accompanied many enzymes involved in essential chemical reactions. To add to that it contributes to bone construction and aids to transport calcium and potassium to keep your heart and muscles contracting properly.

Alternative to Foods that Have Magnesium

Magnesium supplements are available in a variety of forms, including magnesium oxide, citrate, and chloride. The Supplement Facts panel on a dietary supplement label declares the amount of elemental magnesium in the product, not the weight of the entire magnesium-containing compound.

Absorption of magnesium from different kinds of magnesium supplements varies. Forms of magnesium that dissolve well in liquid are more completely absorbed in the gut than less soluble forms. Studies have found that magnesium in the aspartate, citrate, and lactate forms is absorbed more completely and is more bioavailable than magnesium oxide, magnesium chloride, or magnesium sulfate [6][7][8][9][10]. This is because magnesium doesn't dissolve in water well and is difficult to absorb by the intestines. Magnesium that is bound to amino acids (called chelated magnesium and listed as magnesium aspartate, magnesium citrate, or magnesium lactate) is more readily absorbed. 

Also, one study found that very high doses of zinc from supplements (142 mg/day) can interfere with magnesium absorption and disrupt the magnesium balance in the body.[11]

Foods that have Magnesium

Foods that Have Magnesium

Foods that have magnesium come from various animal and plant products. Nuts, beans, green leafy vegetables and whole grains are all good sources of magnesium. Foods high in fiber tend to be abundant in magnesium.

1. Avocados - Magnesium Rich Fruits

One avocado provides 58 mg of magnesium, which is around 15% of the recommended daily value [12]. To add to that, it is packed with fiber. Some experts say that eating avocados help with cholesterol levels and has anti inflammatory properties [13].

2. Nuts 

Nuts like almonds and cashews are not only delicious but nutritious. They are one of the best foods that have magnesium and have been shown to have anti-inflammatory benefits, supporting a healthy heart and appetite control [14].

3. Whole Grains

Whole grains such as barley, oats, quinoa and wheat are excellent foods that have magnesium. There are studies that show that whole grains reduce inflammation and decrease the risk of heart disease [15].

4. Bananas 

Although bananas are widely known for their potassium benefits, many people do not know that they are also rich in magnesium. One large banana contains 37 mg, which is 9% of the recommended daily value [16]. Although bananas have many nutrition benefits, we do recommend that people who are diabetic choose unripe ones rather than ripe bananas. The reason is that ripe bananas are higher in sugar and carbs than most fruits. In addition unripe bananas contain large amount of resistant starch that may reduce inflammation and improve gut health [17].

Magnesium Rich Foods Chart

The following a list of the magnesium content in common food sources of magnesium is sorted by milligrams magnesium per gram of food content.

Serving Size, Common Units

Serving Size, Grams

Milligrams Magnesium

Milligrams Magnesium per Gram

% Daily Value (DV)

Cocoa, unsweetened

2 tbsp.

10

52

5.24

14%

Bran Breakfast Cereal, ready to eat

1 oz.

28

78

2.78

19%

Almonds

1 oz.

28

75

2.68

19%

Cashews, dry roasted

1 oz.

28

73

2.61

18%

Pumpkin Seeds, roasted

1 oz.

28

73

2.61

18%

Molasses

1 tbsp.

20

48

2.42

12%

Peanuts, dry roasted

1 oz.

28

49

1.75

12%

Peanut Butter

2 tbsp.

32

49

1.53

12%

Whole Wheat Bread, homemade

1 slice

28

37

1.32

9%

Halibut

3 oz.

85

91

1.07

23%

Navy Bean Sprouts, raw

1 oz.

28

28

1.01

7%

Mackeral

3 oz.

85

83

0.97

21%

Spinach, boiled

1/2 cup

90

79

0.87

20%

Whole Wheat Bread, store bought

1 slice

28

23

0.82

6%

Coffee, espresso

2 oz.

60

48

0.80

12%

Spinach, raw

1 cup

30

24

0.79

6%

Quinoa, cooked

1/2 cup

92.5

59

0.64

15%

Milk Chocolate

1 oz.

28

18

0.63

4%

Soybeans, boiled

1/2 cup

90

54

0.60

14%

Black-Eyed Peas (Cowpeas), boiled

1/2 cup

87.5

46

0.52

12%

Buckwheat Groats (Kasha), cooked

1/2 cup

84

43

0.51

11%

Parsley, raw

1 oz.

28

14

0.50

3%

Lima Beans, boiled

1/2 cup

94

40

0.43

10%

Acorn squash, baked

1/2 cup

102.5

44

0.43

11%

Swiss Chard

1/2 cup

175

75

0.43

19%

Artichokes

1 whole medium

120

50

0.42

13%

Egg, fried

1 whole large

46

18

0.39

3%

Tofu

1/2 cup

126

47

0.37

12%

Bacon, pan-fried

3 oz.

85

31

0.36

8%

Pork Tenderloin, broiled

3 oz.

85

31

0.36

8%

Okra, boiled

1 cup

160

58

0.36

14%

Bulgur Wheat, cooked

1/2 cup

91

29

0.32

8%

Salmon

3 oz.

85

26

0.31

7%

Whole Wheat Spaghetti

1/2 cup

70

21

0.30

6%

Parsnips, boiled

1/2 cup

78

23

0.29

6%

Chicken Breast, roasted

3 oz.

85

24

0.29

6%

Ground Beef, pan browned

3 oz.

85

24

0.28

6%

Oatmeal

1/2 cup

117

32

0.27

8%

Broccoli, boiled

1/2 cup

78

16

0.21

4%

Pasta Sauce

1/2 cup

128

27

0.21

7%

Potatoes, boiled without skin

1 cup

156

31

0.20

8%

Lettuce

2 leaves

34

4

0.12

1%

Milk, 2%

1 cup

244

27

0.11

7%

Apple

1 medium

182

9

0.05

3%

Coffee, from grounds

6 oz.

178

5

0.03

1%

[Source: http://www.ars.usda.gov/www.nutritiondata.com]

 

[1] Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes for Calcium, Phosphorous, Magnesium, Vitamin D, and Fluoride. Washington, DC: National Academy Press; 1997

[2] Seelig M, Rosanoff A. The Magnesium Factor. New York: Avery; 2003

[3] Mozafar A. Enrichment of some B-vitamins in plants with application of organic fertilizers. Plant and Soil. December 1994;167(2):305-311

[4] Long C, Keiley L. Is Agribusiness Making Food Less Nutritious? Mother Earth News. July 2004. Available at: http://www.motherearthnews.com/Real-Food/2004-06-01/Is-Agribusiness-Making-Food-Less-Nutritious.aspx. Accessed November 11, 2009.

[5] al-Ghamdi SM, Cameron EC, Sutton RA. Magnesium deficiency: pathophysiologic and clinical overview. Am J Kidney Dis 1994; 24:737.

[6] Ranade VV, Somberg JC. Bioavailability and pharmacokinetics of magnesium after administration of magnesium salts to humans. Am J Ther 2001;8:345-57.

[7] Firoz M, Graber M. Bioavailability of US commercial magnesium preparations. Magnes Res 2001;14:257-62.

[8] Mühlbauer B, Schwenk M, Coram WM, Antonin KH, Etienne P, Bieck PR, Douglas FL. Magnesium-L-aspartate-HCl and magnesium-oxide: bioavailability in healthy volunteers. Eur J Clin Pharmacol 1991;40:437-8

[9] Lindberg JS, Zobitz MM, Poindexter JR, Pak CY. Magnesium bioavailability from magnesium citrate and magnesium oxide. J Am Coll Nutr 1990;9:48-55.

[10] Walker AF, Marakis G, Christie S, Byng M. Mg citrate found more bioavailable than other Mg preparations in a randomized, double-blind study. Mag Res 2003;16:183-91.

[11] Spencer H, Norris C, Williams D. Inhibitory effects of zinc on magnesium balance and magnesium absorption in man. J Am Coll Nutr 1994;13:479-84.

[12] http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1843/2

[13] 2013 Feb 26;4(3):384-91. doi: 10.1039/c2fo30226h.

[14]  2013 Nov;67(11):1205-14. doi: 10.1038/ejcn.2013.184. Epub 2013 Oct 2.

[15]  2015 Feb;101(2):251-61. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.114.088120. Epub 2014 Dec 3.

[16] http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1846/2

[17]  2016;68(2):85-93. doi: 10.1159/000441683. Epub 2015 Dec 12.